New work: Faux wood vase

Faux wood vase

Faux wood vase

I bought some new types of paper from Brian Webb at the Centerfold convention in Columbus about a month ago, and this is the first one I’ve gotten to try. This model is folded from Bear Hide paper, but the color reminded me of stained wood (hence the name of this piece).

This was an interesting paper to try out, but it’s one I would only use again for simpler and more geometric models than this. The middle segment folded very nicely, but I had more trouble with the more subtle curves. It was a bit hard to wet-fold this paper, especially since my usual method of taping things in place tended to tear the top layer off the paper. But it’s nice to have a different selection of colors and learn how different papers behave.

New work: Wavy split bowl

Wavy split bowl

Wavy split bowl

This piece combines some of the organic designs I have folded with my Intersections series. Each half of the piece is folded from one uncut circle with one white side and one black side. I like the contrast created by the reversal of the two color patterns.

Since the rest of my Intersections pieces are folded from rectangles, the folding style here is a bit different; the circle allows for the extra paper around the outside to create the waves. The centers of the bowl are shifted away from the centers of the circles, so the waves only extend toward the outside of the bowls.

Butterflies!

Butterfly swirl

Butterfly swirl

I recently decorated my wall with an origami pattern. I’ve done another wall design before (and a previous iteration of the butterflies that I never posted).

The butterflies are Akira Yoshizawa’s design (instructions here; many other diagrams and video instructions available online). It’s a fairly simple design but very elegant. I folded about 100 butterflies from squares ranging from 2 inches to 6 inches, and the total pattern is about 3 feet x 6 feet.

Here’s a close-up that shows the individual butterflies more clearly:

Butterfly swirl (close-up)

Butterfly swirl (close-up)

New Work: Curved Vase

Curved Vase

Curved Vase

I’ve been experimenting lately with a variety of geometric folding techniques. This vase combines the twist pattern I recently designed with one of my earliest vase designs. I like seeing how the new segment changes the overall feel of the vase. The central portion repeats the curved shape of the full vase, but with a lot smaller height.

 

 

New Work: Polka-dotted Vase

Polka-dotted vase

Polka-dotted vase

I’ve been interested in combining tessellations with three-dimensional forms for quite a while, but it’s been a challenge. This is the first piece where I’ve incorporated a tessellated design all over the vase form. I changed the vertical spacing of the dots based on the width and how far apart the dots would be horizontally.

The tessellation is my own design, although it’s simple enough that it may be a re-invention of someone else’s design. I was inspired to fold this design shortly after I folded Lydia Diard’s Circles tessellation because I liked the look of the raised circular (or really, dodecagonal) dots. I figured out how to adapt her design from a hexagonal grid to a square grid, which I posted previously (top photo, bottom right piece). From there, I was able to figure out how to combine the tessellation with the curved-crease vase shapes I usually work with.

This design is a first attempt, and I’d like to find other ways of incorporating tessellated and corrugated elements into my designs. The dots here are visible, but they don’t stand out much more than the horizontal and vertical lines. I’m exploring other ways of combining textures and folded patterns to create visual interest on three-dimensional designs.

New Work: More Airplane Tessellations

After another long trip, here are some more tessellations. There’s an assortment here of designs folded from instructions, designs reverse-engineered from pictures of the folded models, and my own designs (which may be re-inventions of other people’s models).

Tessellations (1)

Tessellations (1)

Tessellations (2)

Tessellations (2)

Tessellations (3)

Tessellations (3)

New Work: Two Geometric Designs

Recently, I’ve returned to more purely geometric designs, exploring some new ideas.

Square vase with inset sides

Square vase with inset sides

This vase looks very clean from the outside, but the folds hidden inside are a bit more messy. I figured out what dimensions I needed for the insets and just hid the extra paper inside and used glue to hold everything in place. Since the angled lines on the main faces are at 45 degrees, the triangles wind up being equilateral.

Twisted stack of boxes

Twisted stack of boxes

The second vase uses a bit different folding approach. Creating the twist is actually fairly straightforward – I would be surprised if it’s not a re-invention of someone else’s idea. I used the same angle between each box here, but any angle from 0 to 90 degrees would work with very minor changes to the crease pattern. It could also work for shapes with more sides, not just squares. Collapsing the stack of twists is a bit tricky and uses a lot of paper, so I’m not sure I would want to try a stack too much taller than this.

New Work: Luminary (2)

Luminary  2 (unlit)

Luminary 2 (unlit)

This piece is one I folded a couple of weeks ago using the same approach as my recent luminary. On the outside of the form, I drew a small spiral of a pattern in ink, which gives a hint of what is on the inside. The inside is painted and has two more patterned spirals.

Luminary 2 (lit)

Luminary 2 (lit)

The shape of this form creates interesting patterns of light and shadow when the model is lit. Near the middle of the model, the section just below the crease line that slopes away from the light appears much darker than the section just above – if the middle of the model flared out much more, the outer part would actually be in shadow. Also, the pattern drawn on the outside appears much crisper than the patterns drawn on the inside. Here is a close-up of the patterns:

Closeup of luminary 2

Closeup of luminary 2

When I spend 40 hours on airplanes…

… I do something like this:

Collection of tessellations

Collection of tessellations

I like folding tessellations while traveling because they are easy to transport (small and mostly flat) and relatively repetitive to fold because of the repetition in the grid and symmetry of the pattern (and so possible to do when I’m tired). All of these are folded from squares of Elephant Hide paper, some painted with acrylic paint. This paper is great for tessellations because it holds up through a lot of folding and unfolding without getting mushy, which many of the more complicated tessellations require.These models are all folded directly from or adapted from Eric Gjerde’s book Origami Tessellations.

Here are some close-up images of some of the tessellations:

Negative Space Stars, designed by Eric Gjerde

Negative Space Stars, designed by Eric Gjerde

Star Puff Tessellation, designed by Ralf Konrad

Star Puff Tessellation, designed by Ralf Konrad

Aztec Twist, designed by Eric Gjerde

Aztec Twist, designed by Eric Gjerde

3.4.6.4, designed by Eric Gjerde

3.4.6.4, designed by Eric Gjerde

Layered squares, adapted from Christine Edison's Modern Blue

Layered squares, adapted from Christine Edison’s Modern Blue

Reverse-engineered/adapted from Christine Edison's Roundabout

Reverse-engineered/adapted from Christine Edison’s Roundabout

New Work: Vertically Curved Vase

Vertically Curved Vase

Vertically Curved Vase

For the past several years, I have been primarily folding curved-crease pleated designs where the pleats are vertical. In this piece, I changed the orientation of the pleats so I could create a different type of curvature of the piece. By using horizontal pleats that vary in width around the piece, I curved the vertical axis of the piece. This piece was primarily a test of a folding style I haven’t used much, but I’m hoping to explore this style of folding more.