New work: Doubly bent vase

Doubly bent vase

Doubly bent vase

This piece incorporates two of my recent crimp-bend variations. I picked the length and angle of the central section to perfect stack the top and bottom sections of the vase. From a perfect side view, the side cutouts are 30-60-90 triangles, which means the math is based on fairly straightforward ratios.

I like that these new bends still have some of the ‘impossible’ feel of the diagonal shifts, but with a bit of a different character. The diagonal shifts usually cut the vase into pieces that could be reassembled into a cylinder, but the bend elements tend to give pieces that don’t necessarily fit back together. And since all of these pieces can be combined, I have a lot of new possibilities I can explore.

New work: Bent variant vase

Bent variant vase

Bent variant vase

This piece uses the new variation on the crimp bend I recently developed. The shape is somewhat reminiscent of my recent bent diagonal shift vase, but with no diagonal shift element. The new bend variation leaves a portion of the bend plane exposed.

Test fold: Bend variation

Bend variation

Bend variation

This is a new variation of my recent crimp-bend design from several months ago. In the original design, I had two sine waves that lined up, with the paper between them crimped to create an internal flat plane. For this variation, I’m using one straight line and one sine wave to define the top and bottom of the bend instead of two sine waves. Because the flat and diagonal planes have different lengths, part of the flat crimped plane is visible.

New work: Floating diagonal shift vase 2

Floating diagonal shift vase 2

Floating diagonal shift vase 2

This piece is also a part of my new diagonal shift series, somewhat inspired by my original Floating Diagonal Shift Vase. This is my first piece to incorporate a downhill diagonal shift with a change in width. Like one of my most recent pieces, since the uphill and downhill shifts are at the same angle, the top and bottom part of the vase line up vertically.

New work: Uphill/downhill diagonal shift vase 2

Uphill/downhill diagonal shift vase 2

Uphill/downhill diagonal shift vase 2

This piece is another addition to my new diagonal shift series. The crease pattern is fairly similar to my most recent piece, with some rearrangements and rotations. The downhill shift lets me create these pieces that look more off-balance than most of my original diagonal shift. For most of these pieces, I add plastic weights to the base to keep the piece from falling over.

New work: Uphill/downhill diagonal shift vase

Uphill/downhill diagonal shift vase

Uphill/downhill diagonal shift vase

This piece is the latest addition to my diagonal shift series. This piece is my first to combine an uphill shift and a downhill shift in the same design. I aligned the two shifts on the same angle, so the top and the bottom halves of the vase are vertically aligned with each other. This creates the illusion that the middle section is sliding out of the vase.

New Work: Bent Diagonal Shift Vase

Bent diagonal shift vase

Bent diagonal shift vase

This piece is another variation of my new diagonal shift series. Like my last downhill diagonal shift design, this piece is a combination of my normal diagonal shift with my recent crimp-bends. The difference is that this piece includes only one bend above the diagonal shift; this creates a difference in angles between the top and bottom halves of the vase.

New Work: Downhill Diagonal Shift Vase

Downhill diagonal shift vase

Downhill diagonal shift vase

This vase uses my recent downhill diagonal shift. The design is quite a bit like my original diagonal shift series, but with some new engineering and a new color scheme. I’m enjoying working with more color, but the brighter colors are also more challenging to work with than the metallic paints I used in my earlier diagonal shift pieces. The paint starts soaking into the paper so quickly that it’s challenging to fix any mistakes or tweak colors without adding a darker second layer. But I like the brighter colors and being able to explore interesting color combinations.

Test Fold: Downhill Diagonal Shift

Downhill diagonal shift

Downhill diagonal shift

I’ve been working on diagonal shift designs for a couple years, but up to this point all of the fully paper diagonal shifts have been ‘uphill’ shifts. With the basic crease pattern I’ve been using, a specific height of the sine wave naturally gives a matching distance for the uphill shift.

After designing my crimp-bent tubes, I realized I can add one bend immediately above the diagonal shift and one bend directly below. This reorients the shift so it’s angled downhill instead of uphill. Because the shift and the bend use the same sine wave, it’s not obvious unless you look very closely that there are extra layers of paper there.

New Work: Zig-zag Vase

Zig-zag vase

Zig-zag vase

This vase uses my recently developed bends to create a zig-zag bend somewhat reminiscent of my diagonal shift series. I like taking simple, elegant vase and bowl forms and adding surprising elements that look almost impossible to create from a single uncut rectangle of paper. Unlike most of my diagonal shift pieces, I decided to align the painted sections across the bend in this piece.

As usual, I painted the paper before folding this model, and I was able to align the painted sections within about 1 mm. That’s pretty good alignment for how far apart the three painted sections are on the full sheet of paper. Each of the two bends hides quite a bit of paper inside the model. The 90-degree bends are a bit harder to fold than the smaller-angle bends I’ve tried before, but they still require a lot less fighting with the paper than the diagonal shifts do.

Painted paper

Painted paper