Crease patterns: Crimp-bends

Wide and narrow crimp bends

Wide and narrow crimp bends

I previously posted images of these crimp-bent tubes that I designed earlier this year, and here are the crease patterns. The top and bottom edge of each bend are based on sine waves. The angles of the internal crimps on each vertical gore use the same math as the diagonal shifts, where each diagonal fold is angled toward one convergence point.

Crease pattern: Crimp bend

Crease pattern: Narrow Crimp bend

Crease pattern: Narrow crimp bend

Crease pattern: Narrow crimp bend

New work: Square/circle twist vase

Square/circle twist vase

Square/circle twist vase

This vase builds on my recent exploration of twists in non-cylindrical tubes. The central twist in this model is a 16-sided twist in a square tube. Like in my previous test fold, the twist naturally creates segments of parabolas on each face of the square tube. I repeated the parabolic shape several times to create the wavy painted pattern with a color gradient.

New work: Peacock vase

Peacock vase

Peacock vase

I bought this marbled paper several months ago because the colors and shapes within the marbling reminded me of a peacock. This vase has a fairly simple shape, also inspired by a peacock. This is a softer paper than I’m used to folding, even after being treated with methylcellulose, but it works for forms of this level of complexity.

New work: Curved-neck vase

Curved-neck vase

Curved-neck vase

This piece builds on my helix from several months ago. The neck of the vase uses a series of crimp-bends at different angles. The crimp-bends are pretty labor-intensive to fold, but it creates an interesting effect. Here’s a second view to show the curvature of the neck more clearly:

Curved-neck vase (side view)

Curved-neck vase (side view)

Test fold: Square/circle twist

Square/circle twist

Square/circle twist

Somewhat inspired by some of Robert Lang’s recent work, this model has a twist that transitions from a 16-sided ‘circle’ to a square. Interestingly, the bottom edges of the square tube are approximately parabolic segments. The center doesn’t quite collapse cleanly, but it’s close enough for practical purposes. This twist is a bit more challenging to fold than the ones I’m used to. I might try incorporating some multi-shape twists like these into some of my more complex models.

New Work: Marbled Vase

Marbled vase

Marbled vase

In the past couple weeks, I’ve been experimenting with papers. Methylcellulose is commonly used in complex origami to size paper, making soft papers stiffer and easier to wet-fold, or to back-coat two sheets of paper and adhere them together.

Since the Elephant Hide paper I usually use doesn’t need to be sized, I didn’t try out methylcellulose until very recently. Since my designs need fairly stiff, thick papers, even adding methylcellulose isn’t enough to make some papers usable. But, if the pretty paper is thin enough, I can use methylcellulose to adhere it to Elephant Hide, and the double-layer paper folds essentially like a sheet of Elephant Hide.

This model is folded from a fairly thin sheet of marbled paper adhered to Elephant Hide. The marbled paper has a bit of texture, so it didn’t stick to the Elephant Hide quite as well as I had hoped, but I was still able to fold it into a relatively simple vase form.

New work: Origami/Ceramic Split Vessel

Origami/Ceramic Split Vessel

Origami/Ceramic Split Vessel

This piece is a continued exploration of origami and ceramic forms, incorporating shapes inspired by my Intersections series. The shapes of the origami and ceramic pieces are nearly the same, and the colored pattern continues from one piece to the other. The design process for these pieces is a bit different from my usual origami designs. Since the ceramic piece shrinks during the drying and firing process, it’s hard to get the precise dimensions that I’m used to in origami. I made the ceramic piece first keeping in mind the constraints of what shapes I can fold, then measured the ceramic piece and folded the paper to fit it exactly.

The difference in precision is also visible in the colored pattern. The ceramic glaze runs and drips a bit during the firing process, and the layering of the blue and white glazes makes the colors a bit mottled. On the origami piece, I taped off the painted edges as I usually do to get precise lines, but I deliberately mottled the paint to mimic the colors in the glaze.

New work: Bent diagonal shift variant vase

Bent diagonal shift variant vase

Bent diagonal shift variant vase

This piece is also part of my ongoing geometric series. The shape is similar to my bent diagonal shift vase, but the top section incorporates one of my bend variations and ends up perpendicular to the plane of the diagonal shift.

New work: Horizontal slide vase

Horizontal slide vase

Horizontal slide vase

This model is somewhat similar to my last horizontal shift piece, but with a central diagonal section added. The folding is very similar to my recent doubly bent vase, but with the directions of the two crimp-bend elements reversed.

New work: Horizontal shift vase

Horizontal shift vase

Horizontal shift vase

This piece is part of my new series of geometric vases. I’ve been working on diagonal shifts for several years, and a couple months ago I figured out how to combine the uphill diagonal shift with crimp-bends to make a downhill diagonal shift. For this model, I combined the diagonal shift with my new crimp-bend variation to get the horizontal shift.