New work: Tilted horizontal shift vase

Tilted horizontal shift vase

Tilted horizontal shift vase

This vase is part of my series of geometrically distorted vases, incorporating a tilt of the main axis of the vase. This vase is similar to one of my recent models, and since that model I’ve figured out how to adapt the curved portions of the vase to keep the horizontal planes all closer to exactly horizontal. The shift in the middle uses the same pattern as my downhill diagonal shifts, with the angle chosen to match the tilt of the vase.

New work: Curved-neck vase 2

Curved-neck vase 2

Curved-neck vase 2

This model is the second in my series of curved-neck vases. These models use the same geometric crimp-bends that I’ve been using my geometrically distorted vases, but the series of bends creates the illusion of a curve. The series of bends is a lot of work to fold, but I like how this model has a different feel from the more strictly geometric pieces I’ve done for a long time.

New work: Tilted bent vase

Tilted bent vase

Tilted bent vase

This model builds on my recent offset bowl, where the model is based on a tilted cylinder. Here, I added curved folds and painted lines to the tilted cylinder, fitting it into my geometrically distorted vase series. The central bend is similar to my previous designs, and the top and bottom planes are also defined by sine waves to transition between the tilted cylinder and flat planes.

Interview in The Fold

I was recently interviewed by Ilan Garibi, and my interview was just published in The Fold:

Origami Designer’s Secrets: Rebecca Lynn Gieseking

Ilan has been writing this series for several years, and it’s an honor to be included alongside so many other great designers. Among other things, I talk about my design and folding process and my sources of inspiration, especially the interplay between art and science in my work. Also included is a crease pattern for my 2012 ornament:

Ornament

Ornament

New Work: Offset Bowl

Offset Bowl

Offset Bowl

Inspired by my diagonal shift pieces, this model is a test piece incorporating several diagonal planes. The base, central plane, and top edge are all defined by sine waves. Unlike my previous models, these sine waves create three planes parallel to the table but tilt the central axis of the bowl. This is fairly straightforward to do with all straight folds, and I’m exploring whether this concept can be used with curved folds in my more complex diagonal shift designs.

Crease pattern: Bend variation

Crease pattern: Bend variation

Crease pattern: Bend variation

I designed a variation to my crimp-bends last spring, and here is the crease pattern. The concept is similar, but instead of being based on two sine waves, this version is based on one sine wave and one straight horizontal line. In this variation, part of the flat plane joining the top and bottom tubes is exposed. So far I haven’t figured out a mathematically correct way to place the central line such that the joining plane folds flat, but it comes close enough to work in practice.

Bend variation

Bend variation

New work: Ornament

Ornament

Ornament

As usual, I designed an ornament this year, similar to my designs the past several years. The paper is hand-painted with several layers of watered-down acrylic paint, which gives a texture a lot like watercolors. It doesn’t show much in the photo, but there’s a thin layer of silver paint on top that gives it a hint of sparkle.

Crease pattern: Downhill diagonal shift

Crease pattern: Downhill diagonal shift

Crease pattern: Downhill diagonal shift

I posted a photo of a test model of the downhill diagonal shift earlier this year. Here is the crease pattern for that model. The central part of the crease pattern is exactly the same as the standard uphill diagonal shift I’ve posted crease patterns of before. The top and bottom sections are the crimp-bends I recently posted and build on the sine waves used in the central diagonal shift. Since each portion of the crease pattern is a distortion of a tube, it’s fairly straightforward to stack these in all sorts of interesting combinations.

Downhill diagonal shift

Downhill diagonal shift

Crease patterns: Crimp-bends

Wide and narrow crimp bends

Wide and narrow crimp bends

I previously posted images of these crimp-bent tubes that I designed earlier this year, and here are the crease patterns. The top and bottom edge of each bend are based on sine waves. The angles of the internal crimps on each vertical gore use the same math as the diagonal shifts, where each diagonal fold is angled toward one convergence point.

Crease pattern: Crimp bend

Crease pattern: Narrow Crimp bend

Crease pattern: Narrow crimp bend

Crease pattern: Narrow crimp bend

New work: Square/circle twist vase

Square/circle twist vase

Square/circle twist vase

This vase builds on my recent exploration of twists in non-cylindrical tubes. The central twist in this model is a 16-sided twist in a square tube. Like in my previous test fold, the twist naturally creates segments of parabolas on each face of the square tube. I repeated the parabolic shape several times to create the wavy painted pattern with a color gradient.